SHORT FICTIVE REFLECTIONS ON THE PERCEPTION OF A POSTSECONDARY EXPERIENCE OF LONG-TERM INCARCERATED JUVENILES

Authors

  • Gregory Barraza Chapman University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18432/ari29550

Keywords:

juvenile justice education, culturally relevant teaching, arts-based research, correctional education, funds of knowledge

Abstract

There is a gap in the literature regarding postsecondary opportunities for incarcerated youth. Research and curriculum design are rarely available for the purpose of improving juvenile postsecondary correctional education thereby not improving recidivism rates of formerly incarcerated students. The pilot program in this study attempted to provide a comprehensive university program for long-term incarcerated juveniles to get them on track to obtain a bachelor’s degree. This study addressed the academic experiences, including the School to Prison Pipeline and the academic experience to provide information, justifying the importance of creating postsecondary academic opportunities for incarcerated juveniles. Then, the study analyzed interviews with recently released students of the program to give insight to correctional education experiences vis-à-vis artistic representations, in this case, short fiction. This article presents fictive artistic representations that give a closer look at the secondary and postsecondary educational experiences of two of the cohort participants.

Author Biography

Gregory Barraza, Chapman University

Dr. Gregory Barraza has been a teacher in alternative, correctional education for 24 years. He is Coordinator of Inmate Education for Santa Ana College’s Centennial Education Center, as well as an adjunct professor at Chapman University, Attallah College of Educational Studies. His areas of interest are the efficacy of correctional education and juvenile justice education, specifying on the social and cultural influences that lead to the school to prison pipeline.

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Published

2021-04-22

How to Cite

Barraza, G. (2021). SHORT FICTIVE REFLECTIONS ON THE PERCEPTION OF A POSTSECONDARY EXPERIENCE OF LONG-TERM INCARCERATED JUVENILES. Art/Research International: A Transdisciplinary Journal, 6(1), 84–102. https://doi.org/10.18432/ari29550