Binge Drinking and Educational Participation among Youth in the COMPASS Host Study (Year 5: 2016/2017): School Connectedness and Flourishing as Compensatory Factors

Authors

  • Simone D. Holligan
  • Wei Qian
  • Margaret de Groh
  • Ying Jiang
  • Karen A. Patte
  • Katelyn Battista
  • Scott T. Leatherdale

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.29173/cjfy29585

Abstract

The current study investigated resilience factors influencing the associations between binge drinking and measures of educational participation among Canadian youth. Self reported data were collected during the 2016/2017 school year from 5238 students in Grades 9 through 12 (2744 females, 2494 males) attending 14 secondary schools in Ontario and British Columbia as part of the COMPASS study. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine relationships between binge drinking, school connectedness and flourishing on measures of educational participation. Binge drinking was associated with increased likelihood of skipping classes, going to class without completing homework, lower Math and English scores, and having educational and/or training expectations and aspirations beyond high school only. Decreased flourishing was linked to increased likelihood of going to class with incomplete homework, lower Math and English scores, and decreased likelihood of aspiring and expecting to achieve education and/or training beyond high school only. Increased school connectedness was associated with decreased likelihood of skipping classes and going to class with incomplete homework, higher Math and English scores, and increased the likelihood of aspiring to and expecting to achieve education and/or training beyond high school only. Lower flourishing was additive in its effect on current binge drinking in negatively impacting class attendance and homework completion and academic performance, while higher school connectedness was compensatory in its effect on these outcomes. This study suggests that, for high school students who are susceptible to binge drinking, those who are more connected to school and have a higher sense of wellbeing can maintain active participation in school and achieve their educational goals.

Downloads

Published

2020-06-29

Issue

Section

Articles