Key Strengths of an Innovative Volunteer Training Workshop

  • Angelika Sellick
  • Monique Bournot-Trites
  • Ken Reeder
  • Andrew Scales
  • Mark Smith
  • Sandra Zappa-Hollman

Abstract

The study involved 14 volunteer facilitators, four UBC staff members, and the researcher as participant; the data collected were observation notes, questionnaires, results from focus groups, and interviews. The study revealed that the key strengths of the training workshop lay in its approach to training, its focus on confidence and capacity building, the appreciation and contribution of volunteers’ assets, and the support of the sponsoring university. The article concludes with a consideration of the implications for strategic planning for university-community engagement and replication of the program in other educational contexts.

Author Biographies

Angelika Sellick
Angelika Sellick received her MA from the University of British Columbia in language and literacy education. She was a research assistant with the Centre for Intercultural Language Studies at UBC and currently works as a literacy outreach coordinator in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside.
Monique Bournot-Trites
Monique Bournot-Trites is an associate professor in the Department of Language and Literacy Education in the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia. She is the director of modern language education, and her research is on second-language acquisition and assessment.
Ken Reeder
Ken Reeder is professor of language and literacy education at the University of British Columbia and serves as academic director of the UBC Ritsumeikan Academic Exchange Program. His research program deals with appropriate technologies for language teaching and learning, applied/educational linguistics, and first- and second-language acquisition.
Andrew Scales
Andrew Scales is the academic director of the English Language Institute at the University of British Columbia Continuing Studies.
Mark Smith
Mark Smith is community programs manager at the University of British Columbia Learning Exchange. His work experience includes managing community-living support for people moving out of institutional care in Scotland, and teaching ESL in Canada. Mark holds an MA from Glasgow University and is currently undertaking an MEd at Simon Fraser University.
Sandra Zappa-Hollman
Sandra Zappa-Hollman is a lecturer in the Department of Language and Literacy Education at the University of British Columbia. She works as academic writing coordinator in the UBC Ritsumeikan Academic Exchange Program.
Published
2011-11-01
Section
Articles