Imaginations: Journal of Cross-Cultural Image Studies (ARCHIVES) https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations <p><em>Imaginations</em>&nbsp;is a multilingual, open-access journal of international visual cultural studies //&nbsp;<em>Imaginations</em>&nbsp;est une revue plurilingue à accès libre sur les études visuelles&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Welcome to the journal&nbsp;archives |&nbsp;Bienvenue sur la page d'archives de la revue</strong></p> <p>PLEASE READ |&nbsp;LISEZ //&nbsp;<em>IMAGINATIONS&nbsp;</em>here | à cette adresse //&nbsp;<a href="http://imaginations.csj.ualberta.ca/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">http://imaginations.csj.ualberta.ca/</a></p> <p>All written submissions should be sent to&nbsp;<a href="mailto:imaginations@ualberta.ca">imaginations@ualberta.ca</a>&nbsp;and prepared for blind-peer review. //&nbsp;Les soumissions doivent être envoyées à&nbsp;<a href="mailto:imaginations@ualberta.ca">imaginations@ualberta.ca</a>&nbsp;dans un format permettant l’évaluation à l’aveugle par les pairs.</p> en-US <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ca/" rel="license"><img style="border-width: 0;" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/2.5/ca/88x31.png" alt="Creative Commons License" /></a><br />This work by <a href="/index.php/imaginations" rel="cc:attributionURL">https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations</a> is licensed under a  <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/">Creative Commons 4.0 International License</a> although certain works referenced herein may be separately licensed, or the author has exercised their right to fair dealing under the Canadian Copyright Act. imaginations@ualberta.ca (Markus Reisenleitner) bbellamy@ualberta.ca (Brent Bellamy) Fri, 28 Dec 2018 00:00:00 -0700 OJS 3.1.1.4 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Introduction: Fashion Media Cultures https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29405 <p>---</p> Katrina Sark ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29405 Fri, 28 Dec 2018 00:00:00 -0700 The Canadian Fashion Scholars Network https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29406 <p>---</p> Katrina Sark ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29406 Fri, 28 Dec 2018 00:00:00 -0700 The Ruby Slippers Across Time, Space and Media https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29407 <p><em style="box-sizing: border-box; font-style: italic; caret-color: #484848; color: #484848; font-family: Karla, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none;">This article discusses representations of Dorothy’s magical shoes in diverse media—from the original text by L. Frank Baum (1900) to the classic MGM film (1939) to Vogue’s 2005 fashion shoot by Annie Leibovitz. According to Salman Rushdie, “the real secret of the ruby slippers is not that ‘there’s no place like home’, but rather that there is no longer any such place as home.” Canadian designer John Fluevog shares this point of view, as exemplified most prominently by The Cosmos: Meteor shoes (2016), which celebrate the road as the destination itself. I compare Fluevog to Gucci’s flamboyant Star Trek-inspired campaign GucciandBeyond (2017), as well as the brand’s more recent Utopian Fantasy campaign (2018). The essay cites, among others, Alain de Botton and Andy Warhol, both professing their fascination with air travel. Additional critical sources include Dick Hebdige’s pioneering work on style subcultures, and MOMA’s recent volume on <em style="box-sizing: border-box; font-style: italic;">Fashion Is</em>. The essay’s concluding sections discusses commercial appropriation of fashion, as well as fashion’s open-ended definition.</em></p> Elena Siemens ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29407 Fri, 28 Dec 2018 00:00:00 -0700 Reading Glamour in Phyllis Brett Young’s The Torontonians https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29408 <p><em style="box-sizing: border-box; font-style: italic; caret-color: #484848; color: #484848; font-family: Karla, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none;">This article explores the relationships between fashion, glamour, celebrity, and Canadian literature, focusing specifically on Toronto, Canada. I argue for the value of “reading glamour” into Toronto’s literature by examining how glamour provides a socio-cultural insight into character and plot development and, moreover, elevates the character of the city itself. No doubt certain authors conjure up a glamorous cachet with their coterie of bohemian intellectual and literary salons but the writing itself rarely approaches the same level of glamorous celebration. However, reading glamour—that is, following Brown, tracing the language and grammar of glamour as a literary form linked to modern mass culture—extends the potential for literary and cultural expression of the text. As Gundle and Castelli argue, glamour is typically associated with the urban and cosmopolitan, and this paper explores how Toronto has historically engaged with its own sense of burgeoning celebrity, fashion, and glamour. By focusing on the work of Phyllis Brett Young’ s <em style="box-sizing: border-box; font-style: italic;">The Torontonians</em>(1960), I examine how glamour as a corollary to fashion challenges preconceptions of “Toronto the Good,” not only within the local urban imaginary but also on national and global levels.</em></p> Kathryn Franklin ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29408 Fri, 28 Dec 2018 00:00:00 -0700 A Clean Sharp Image https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29409 <p><em class="Italic" style="box-sizing: border-box; font-style: italic; caret-color: #161616; color: #161616; font-family: Karla, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: -0.4000000059604645px; orphans: auto; text-align: left; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none;">Canadian sports commentator Don Cherry is notorious for his outspoken opinions and flamboyant style, both attracting popular attention. This article examines his attention-grabbing on-air style as an extension of both his values for the game of hockey and his view of himself as a working-class boy made good. I argue that Cherry deliberately uses his suits to embody his social and personal values. Drawing on fashion studies approaches, I show that while not exactly fashionable in terms of trendiness, Cherry’s suits are examples of the ability of clothing to be indexical of working-class personality transformed.</em></p> Julia Petrov ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29409 Fri, 28 Dec 2018 00:00:00 -0700 Wonder Woman’s Costume as a Site for Feminist Debate https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29410 <p><em class="Italic" style="box-sizing: border-box; font-style: italic; caret-color: #484848; color: #484848; font-family: Karla, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none;">In this article, I examine how much of the fierce debate and discourse around Wonder Woman has centred around her costume. While several academics have addressed the relationship between Wonder Woman and feminism, my article engages with these works to examine the arguments surrounding Wonder Woman’s dress, particularly in the context of comic books and graphic novels that feature the character. The article argues that it is Wonder Woman’s apparel, and not her status as a superhero, that is the site of the controversy surrounding her persona and role as a feminist figure.</em></p> Jaclyn Marcus ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29410 Fri, 28 Dec 2018 00:00:00 -0700 Where the Boys Who Keep Swinging Are Now https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29411 <p><span style="caret-color: #484848; color: #484848; font-family: Karla, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: italic; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration: none; display: inline !important; float: none;">This article illustrates the mechanisms by which Berlin and Vienna have come to figure differently in the global fashion imaginary. It establishes the stylistic locational relationality of Hedi Slimane and Helmut Lang, two fashion designers known for distinctive styles that resist the mainstream of bourgeois respectability. The relational nature of their locational identities—Slimane’s attraction to Berlin and Lang’s rejection of Vienna—is tied to the cities’ urban imaginaries, which work by making particular periods and styles of the cities’ histories hegemonic.</span></p> Susan Ingram ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29411 Fri, 28 Dec 2018 00:00:00 -0700 Suzi Webster Interviewed by Katrina Sark https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29412 <p>---</p> Suzi Webster ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29412 Fri, 28 Dec 2018 00:00:00 -0700 Suzi Webster Portfolio https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29413 <p>---</p> Suzi Webster ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29413 Fri, 28 Dec 2018 00:00:00 -0700 Faux Real https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29414 <p>---</p> Jill Harbin ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/imaginations/index.php/imaginations/article/view/29414 Fri, 28 Dec 2018 00:00:00 -0700