Information Literacy Strategies Used by Second- and Third-Year Biology Students

Authors

  • Catherine Lantz
  • Paula R Dempsey

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.29173/istl13

Abstract

Results from focus groups with 23 second- and third-year biology students revealed gradual gains in information literacy (IL) abilities and dispositions needed for them to join the community of scientific practice as laid out in the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Students were consumers of information and not yet producers of information. They interacted often with primary research articles but struggled to use research tools effectively; remembered active learning vividly; and relied on video resources, Google, and discussions with peers and instructors to define terms and understand results. Findings support the value of collaboration between librarians and science faculty to incorporate IL skills in the process of scientific discovery.

Author Biographies

Catherine Lantz

Catherine Lantz
Reference and Liaison Librarian
Richard J. Daley Library
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago, Illinois
clantz@uic.edu

Paula R Dempsey

Paula R. Dempsey
Head Librarian, Research Services & Resources
Richard J. Daley Library
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago, Illinois
dempseyp@uic.edu

References

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Published

2019-07-15

How to Cite

Lantz, C., & Dempsey, P. R. (2019). Information Literacy Strategies Used by Second- and Third-Year Biology Students. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, (92). https://doi.org/10.29173/istl13

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Articles