Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Academic Librarian Positions during 2013: What Carnegie Classifications Reveal About Desired STEM Skills.

Authors

  • Kelli Trei

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5062/F4XG9P57

Abstract

This study analyzes the requirements and preferences of 171 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) academic librarian positions in the United States as advertised in 2013. This analysis compares the STEM background experience preferences with the Carnegie rankings of the employing institution. The research examines the extent to which employers are emphasizing STEM experience beyond academic degree preferences or requirements and also investigates continuous appointment positions and their advertisements. The findings show that institutions with higher research output as defined by Carnegie rankings are more likely to require STEM experience of some kind. Advertisements do not require STEM bachelor and advanced degrees a great deal of the time. Although these employers prefer them, they will many times accept other STEM experience in place of these degrees. Additionally, the study shows that continuous appointment positions are much more likely to be available in high research output institutions and more likely to require a degree in a STEM field. This study reveals new information in relation to the research ranking of an institution and how it relates to required experience beyond a STEM degree as well as the higher desire for a STEM degree by continuous appointment positions. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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References

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Published

2015-06-01

How to Cite

Trei, K. (2015). Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Academic Librarian Positions during 2013: What Carnegie Classifications Reveal About Desired STEM Skills. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, (80). https://doi.org/10.5062/F4XG9P57

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Refereed Articles
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