Digital Realities of Indigenous Language Revitalization: A Look at Hawaiian Language Technology in the Modern World

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Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu Galla

Abstract

This paper discusses some barriers, complexities, and opportunities Indigenous peoples face when engaging in language revitalization efforts, and how those elements contribute to the adoption, adaptation, or abandonment of digital technology. I begin with framing the context of Indigenous languages in the United States and Canada to underscore the current realities in comparison to world languages. The next section introduces the uptake of digital technology for Indigenous language learning, based on the themes of equity, access, and engagement. I conclude with a case study of the Hawaiian language community as a potential model for Indigenous communities that choose traditional and contemporary pathways.

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How to Cite
Kaleimamoowahinekapu Galla, C. (2018). Digital Realities of Indigenous Language Revitalization: A Look at Hawaiian Language Technology in the Modern World. Language and Literacy, 20(3), 100-120. https://doi.org/10.20360/langandlit29412
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Articles
Author Biography

Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu Galla, University of British Columbia

Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu Galla, Native Hawaiian, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Language & Literacy Education at the University of British Columbia Vancouver. She received her MA in Native American Linguistics and a PhD in Language, Reading and Culture with a specialization in Indigenous language revitalization, education, and digital technology from the University of Arizona (UA). She served as the Program Coordinator of the American Indian Language Development Institute at the UA, and returned back to Hawaiʻi to teach in Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language at the University of Hawaiʻi in Hilo.