The Case of Goa: History, Rhetoric and Nationalism

Authors

  • Philip Bravo

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.21971/P72P4B

Abstract

The Indian armed forces "liberation" of the small Portuguese colony of Goa in 1961 put an end to a fruitless diplomatic contest between New Delhi and Lisbon. The arguments used by each government to defend its right to Goa provide an interesting case study of how history can be used in an attempt to define a "people." Since few Goans were persuaded to make a stand on either side of this debate, this case indicates the limited power of nationalist rhetoric, and therefore the need for historians to look beyond such rhetoric to understand the formation of national identity.

Author Biography

Philip Bravo

Philip Bravo is completing his MA at the University of Manitoba. He was born in Portugal and was raised in Winnipeg. His main areas of research are nationalism and imperialism particularly in South Asia, theories of history and postcolonial theory.

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Published

2008-02-21

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Section

Articles