About the Journal

Focus and Scope

Art/Research International is a forum dedicated to exploring and advancing art as and/or within the research process across disciplines and internationally.

Peer Review Process

Art/Research International publishes material in three sections:

     Art/Research Theoretical Musings

     Art/Research In Action

     Art/Research Reviews

Submissions for the In Action and Theoretical Musing sections will undergo a double-anonymous review process involving at least two reviewers. Reviewers will be selected by Art/Research International editors based on academic discipline, content area, artistic medium, or some combination of these.

Reviewers will be asked to evaluate submissions based on the unique criteria of each section.

Art/Research Theoretical Musings criteria include: relevance; significance of ideas; quality of writing; quality of documentation.

Art/Research In Action criteria include: relevance; significance; aesthetic power; resonance; high ethical standards; reflexivity; quality of documentation.

Reviewers will provide feedback for authors and a recommendation to editors regarding the submission's suitability for publication in Art/Research International. Possible recommendations include: accept as submitted; accept with minor revisions; revise and re-submit; reject or recommend submission to another journal.

Submissions for the Art/Research Reviews section will be reviewed by the section editor; they are not peer reviewed.

Publication Frequency

Art/Research International publishes issues twice each calendar year.

Open Access Policy

This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

Publication Schedule

Art/Research International is published twice yearly in January/February and July/August. Authors should keep in mind that the review process takes several weeks to complete.

Journal History

Art/Research International is a forum dedicated to exploring and advancing art as and/or within the research process across disciplines and internationally.

This journal was brought to life in 2014/2015, with first issue in 2016.

Original Co-Editors-In-Chief: Dr. Diane Conrad, Dr. Patricia Leavy

Associate Editors involved in first issue: Jaime Fiddler, Lindsay Eales, Dr. Gioia Chilton, Julia Gray, Dr. Monica Prendergast, Dr. Pamela Richardson, Victoria Scotti, Jaye Thiel, Dr. Deanna Yerichuk

Associate Editors for the second issue: Jaime Fiddler, Lindsay Eales, Dr. Julia Gray, Dr. Monica Prendergast, Dr. Pamela Richardson, Dr. Jaye Thiel, Dr. Deanna Yerichuk, Dr. Laurel Hart.

Associate Editors for the third issue: Jaime Fiddler, Lindsay Eales, Dr. Monica Prendergast, Dr. Pamela Richardson, Dr. Jaye Thiel, Dr. Deanna Yerichuk, Dr. Laurel Hart, Dr. Patti Pente, Dr. Marcy Meyer.

Original logo design by Dr. Pauline Sameshima (Lakehead University)

Conceiving Brand through Logo Design

By Pauline Sameshima

In designing the ARI logo, I had the humbling honour of working with a brilliant and generous team and I am grateful for the opportunity. Here I share a little of my thinking in the logo design process.

First, a journal "brand" must be conceived. The brand is not the logo, but what the logo promises—the attributes of some of the things the journal can offer. The brand is the journal's unique selling feature. The logo should be a reminder of these attributes. I was fortunate to know the work of the co-editors and examples of logos they liked helped me to see that they valued connectivity and overlap.

I chose to use a turning wheel because it represents a dynamic team facilitating forward-thinking research in perpetual motion. The sum is greater than the parts. The wheel is interdisciplinary, unconventional, and part of the symbolic global. There is a peace sign in the logo representing support of social justice issues. The Venus symbol (circle substituted with iconic triangle dress) recalls feminist philosophies and sociology outlooks. The logo also alludes to Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian man’s widespread arms and legs to symbolize inclusion, harmony, and aesthetics in the journal’s brand.