Patterns Repeat: Transformation Through Creativity in Research about Land and Colonialism

Margaret McKeon

Abstract


Within arts-based research, creativity becomes methodology. The art-work created may or may not participate in disrupting and renewing our world, may or may not bear its own heart beat. In this reflective and lyrical paper, I explore, in form and content, sacredness in the creative process and its potential for creating transformative works capable of disrupting deep patterns of colonial violence and loss. Sitting with a research question of what it means to “listen” to the land, I story experiences within and outside doctoral studies in which I grow and learn through Western, Indigenous and my ancestral Irish-Celtic teachings.

Keywords


creative process; transformation; colonialism; intergenerational trauma; relationship with land

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18432/ari29387

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