Bibliometric Analysis Provides a Detailed Map of Information Literacy Literature in the Social Sciences and Humanities

  • Jessica A. Koos Stony Brook University Libraries, Stony Brook, New York, United States of America

Abstract

A Review of:

Bhardwaj, R.K. (2017). Information literacy in the social sciences and humanities: A bibliometric study. Information and Learning Science, 188(1/2), 67–89. https://doi.org/10.1108/ILS-09-2016-0068

Abstract

Objective – To determine the scope and distribution of information literacy research documents in the humanities and social sciences published from 2001 to 2012.

Design – Bibliometric analysis.

Setting – N/A

Subjects – 1,990 document records retrieved from a Scopus database search. 

Methods – Using the database Scopus, the author created and conducted a search for documents related to the concept of information literacy. Articles, review papers, conference articles, notes, short surveys, and letters were included in the results. Only documents published from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2012 were included in the study. The author then performed various bibliometric analyses of the results.

Main Results – The author found that the number of publications and citations have increased over time, although the average citations per publication (ACPP) decreased significantly during the time period being studied. The majority of the literature published on this topic is in English and produced within the United States. The Transformative Activity Index was calculated to determine changes in publishing patterns across countries from 2001 to 2012. The amount of research collaboration across countries was calculated as well, with the U.S. being the most collaborative. The top journals publishing on this topic were identified by calculating the h-index. An individual from Universidad de Granada in Spain published the greatest number of articles from a single author, and this university was found to have produced the greatest amount of research. Documents produced by the United Kingdom have the highest citation rates. A total of 1,385 documents were cited at least once, and each item on average was cited five times.

Conclusion – Most of the articles on information literacy in the social sciences and humanities comes from developed countries. The results of this study may help to inform those interested in researching this field further.

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Author Biography

Jessica A. Koos, Stony Brook University Libraries, Stony Brook, New York, United States of America

Senior Assistant Librarian/Health Sciences Librarian

Published
2019-12-12
How to Cite
KoosJ. A. (2019). Bibliometric Analysis Provides a Detailed Map of Information Literacy Literature in the Social Sciences and Humanities. Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, 14(4), 177-178. https://doi.org/10.18438/eblip29628
Section
Evidence Summaries